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IL SECOLO BREVE DI PISA. L’ARCHITETTURA DURANTE LA PRIMA OCCUPAZIONE FIORENTINA (1406-1494) FRA TRADIZIONE E INNOVAZIONE

Marco Frati

 

Pisan architecture in the fifteenth century, the first age of political domination of Florence on the former independent maritime republic, was marked by an opposition between the persistent Romanesque and Gothic local tradition, and the introduction of Florentine Renaissance innovations. The presence of early Renaissance masters, the activity of specialized craftsmen, and the generosity of Medicean patrons (foremost among them the bishop Filippo, who built the extraordinary Bishop’s Palace) favored the diffusion of the new architectural language – Brunelleschian at first, then Albertian – which was mainly employed in decorations, exterior elements, and courtyards, without undermining, except for its fortified walls, the medieval image of the town.